Floorball – Tell your players what you want from them

After you get to know your floorball players, and you’ve discovered what they want, it’ll be time to explain to them what you want from them. Go ahead, be honest, you’ll gain nothing by lying to your floorball players. Tell them what you want from them and what you will do for them. Make sure that your floorball players have the opportunity to ask you for help.

Floorball practices and drills for 6, 7, 8, 9 and 10 year olds

Make sure that you take this process very seriously! You’ll refer back to this over and over again during your floorball season. When floorball players start to drag, remind them of what you are trying to do for them. Be prepared to ask them how you can help them.  Always remember, the floorball coach works for his players harder than they work for him.  He sets the tone. A floorball coach that is not working his tail off has no business asking his floorball players to do the same.

Floorball Motivation – Get to know your players

The first thing you have to do is pretty simple, to get motivated floorball players. You’ve got to get to know your floorball players and find out why they have signed up to play in your floorball team.

Floorball defense

Because, let’s face it, if all twenty something of your floorball players are just interested in having a bit of fun and not working very hard, you are NOT going to do anything, but make yourself frustrated trying to convince an entire floorball team to see things your way. Figure out what your players want, meet them there and start guiding them towards the future or your vision for the floorball team.

Floorball – Teamwork – Playing together

This part is about predicting a floorball teams performance and possibility to deliver results. The Teamwork part consist of three blocks, capacity + team spirit – co-operational losses = team performance.

In capacity you can put in:
Practice facilities
The amount of football practices
Practice length
How you use the practice time (quality of the practice)
Training equipment
Support round the team (ass. Coaches, goalie trainers, material management, doctors)

Strengthen resources and skills

Build up your resources and the individual skills of your players. A team with individual competent players will obviously have better opportunities compared with less skilled teams. In the team capacity you include physics, condition, fitness, speed, strength, body size, attitude, motivation, mental or psychological skills and coordination skills. Other categories are age, experience, education, gender and social status.
Support round the team like assistant coaches, goalkeeping coaches, fitness trainers, physics, masseurs, doctors, sports scientist, sport psychologist etc.

Manchester United for example has, a full time doctor, five physios, a fitness coach, a weights coach, an optometrist…

“Captains and coaches from all over the world considered that Mourinho got the best results with less resources than their rivals, but he has been rude and with no education in his behaviour to achieve his objectives.” /Franz Beckenbauer

Floorball victory through best youth practices and drills

Team-spirit can be described in many ways, here some keywords:
How well we know each other
Striving together towards a common goal
Showing that you are ready to do things for others (acting)
Solving problems together
Good communication
Supporting each other

Co-operational losses can be described as the opposite to team-spirit, but also as more practical losses during a practice or a game:
Lack of…
How you use the practice time (quality of the practice)
Support round the team (ass. Coaches, goalie trainers)
Common goals
Solving problems together
Supporting each other

Floorball practices and drills 2 on 1

Co-operational losses can also be:
Undefined roles
Bad passes
Wrong positioning
Bad performance/errors during the drills on your practice
Unclear directives
We and them thinking or me and you (in a negative way)
Egoistic behavior (in a negative way)

Smooth co-operation

Get the different groups in your team to work together smoothly, through for example the team set up (like e.g. 2-2-1) and with synchronizing defense and forwards. The composal of the floorball team is important in avoiding co-operational losses. To practice with the same speed and intensity as in a floorball game is obvious for every coach. In avoiding the social loafing part, you need to have clear roles, responsibilities and norms in your floorball team.

Ringelmann study – Tug of war

One of the earliest studies in the area of co-operational losses and social loafing was done by Ringelmann. Ringelmann let people participate in a “tug of war”. He started to measure their individual capacity, which was defined as 100%. Then they did the exercise in pairs, with three people, four people and so on. The result showed that in pairs they reached 93% of their capacity, three people reached 85% of their individual capacity, 77% in a team of four and only 49% in a team of eight people.

The tendency that peoples effort decreases in a larger group is sometimes called the “Ringelmann effect”, he’s study is supported with more recent studies (Ingham, Levinger, Graves & Peckham, 1974) This could explain why some star players sometimes are invisible during a game, they are waiting for the other players to perform and not counting their own low performance will be visible. It can also be the opposite, many of the team members take a step back and wait for the star player to win the game for the team. This type of social loafing will appear on all levels, in all ages and regardless of gender.

Social loafing as a result from a red card?

Social loafing can also be visible after a red card in a football game, the team with all players left feel they have an advantage and instead of continuing, they take a step back and feel comfortable, social loafing and the team with only ten players might feel they need to take greater responsibility and therefore the game might continue look like they play with even strength.

With this prerequisites you should try to improve you capacity and team spirit and to reduce the co-operational losses.

Easiest part to copy between floorball teams

The easiest part to improve or at least get the right prerequisites from the beginning in big European football teams is probably the capacity block, and now I’m talking about really big teams like Manchester United, Manchester City, Chelsea, Inter, Real Madrid, Bayern Munich etc. You can buy the players “you want”, you have everything in place round the team, and this is the part that’s also easiest to “copy” between the teams.

But unlimited money will not grant you success, there are many failures back in time with clubs getting a lot of money and unlimited resources to buy players, but the victories aren’t still coming and then you have problems with other parts in this football leadership model, like team-spirit, co-operational losses, motivation or common goals…

I don’t think José Mourinho had the best team regarding capacity in Inter 2010, of course he had world-class players, but not the best indivual players, some other teams had stronger names on the paper (e.g. Barcelona), but he mastered the other parts in leading the team in a briljant way. He was able to motivate the players, build up a strong team-spirit and reduce the co-operational losses and the result was there, three titles!

“It is like having a blanket that is too small for the bed. You pull the blanket up to keep your chest warm and your feet stick out. I cannot buy a bigger blanket becuase the supermarket is closed. But I am content because the blanket is cashmere. It is no ordinary blanket.”

“We are on top at the moment but not because of the club’s financial power. We are in contention for a lot of trophies because of my hard work.”  José Mourinho

Floorball – Motivation

Every floorball coach struggles with motivating his or her players from time to time. You’d think that this wouldn’t be a problem, you’d think that that all of your floorball players would be highly motivated already. I mean they signed up to be your floorball team, right? They MUST all be highly motivated and ready for you to mold them into stars… right?

Okay, stop laughing. I know, I know… Wake up! I’m dreaming! I’ll bet you thought the same thing when you first started coaching. You entered into this with the idea that everyone would be happy to see you, and that everyone would look to you for guidance, but that impression didn’t last for ever or did it?

Floorball youth coaching drills and practices

So what can you do with your floorball players strangely lacking drive to run through a brick wall for you and the team? Well, the first thing you need to understand is that every player is different. Not all of your floorball players are dynamos of energy, ready and willing to die for the cause. No, some of them just want to have a bit of fun in the sunshine, while others wan’t to be floorball superstars. Get to know your floorball players and theire motives and their vision of being in the floorball team to find the answer and the correct ingredients to get them motivated.

Floorball – Motivation to stay in the team

So far we have been talking about motivation to do something. What a bout the motivation to continue within the same team, stay in the group? Motivation to stay in the floorball team can be divided into two categories:
– Forces that attract team members to the team (task oriented, to win games tournaments)
– Resistance towards splitting up (force inside the team to continue as a team)

Zlatan Ibrahimovic left Inter for Barcelona in order to be able to win the Champions League. Inter with Jose Mourinho won Serie A, Coppa Italia and Champions League, the year Ibrahimovic left.
Mourinho left Inter for Real Madrid but, most of the Inter players stayed in the team, even if there were a lot of rumors about transfers, but not many of them showed up to be true in the end. The force to stay in the same team was stronger than the attraction of other teams, except for José Mourinho.

Floorball youth skill drills and practices

Research shows that a high turnover among players/employees is expensive, time consuming and affects the satisfaction and communication negatively among the players in the team.
When it comes to changing the coach it looks like the change is connected to negative results in case of continuous change of coaches.

“The magic triple we won with Mourinho, no one can take that away from us, and we have the same team as last year, so no one can say we can not do it again” /Javier Zanetti

Floorball – For me or for someone else?

Internal or external motivation? The internal motivation comes from you, you do something because you want to (and you know why) and you can see the benefits for you. External motivation comes from for example external rewards, like prices, money or other benefits. It can be hard to tell what did motivate you most, but on the long term the internal motivation is the motivation that will help you most in your performance. Other sources for motivation might be:
– Task related motivation, comes from the teams goals and purpose, common efforts towards a common goal.
– Social related motivation comes from the social intercourse with the other team members
– Internal motivation comes from individual reward, goals and performance.

What is it that motivates us with a particular task. This may be some reasons:
– Social satisfaction
– Tournament moments
– Self-control
– Lifestyle
– Physical and mental wellbeing
– Success quest
– Money – survival – Luxury
– Status
– Competition
– (Nice view), See the Waterboy example in – For me, the team or why do I do it.

floorball reward

Rewards may increase motivation?

Yes answers, most people probably without thinking. So here’s a little story:
There was a group of boys who used to play football at a farmer’s field. The farmer himself did not like it and tried repeatedly to drive away those little football players, without success.
He decided to go for a new tactic. He walked up to the boys playing football and said that everyone would get 50 cents, each time they played football at his field. Next week, he gave them one Euro each. The week after he told the boys that he had short of money so they could only get 50 cents again. The next week he said he would only be able to pay 20 cents. The young football players were really upset, “Who do you think you are? How can you believe that anyone of us would play for you, for 20 cents?” So what the boys had done with joy and for fun (internal motivation), ended up as the farmer wanted, they quit playing after the external reward was minized or removed…

When a man comes home with flowers, the question might be “Okey, what have you done now, why do you bring me flowers? Or when you receive or are offered something for free, you immediately think “What do they want me to buy from them or what kind of subscription/contract is behind the gift”?
Rewards are good and fun, but you have to have the insight that people or your players perceive it very differently. Therefore, it is good to explain and justify carefully why you give the person something. Otherwise, some people get the feeling that the other person is trying to take control of me and tie me up by giving me something.

It’s good to have money, so you can buy things that can be bought with money. It’s although a lot better to not lose the things that cannot be bought with money. (It’s better to have internal than external motivation)

For Me, the Floorball Team or why do I do it?

There is a general model to talk about individual motivation. The closer a thing is to your “heart” the more it will motivate you (internal motivation), or in other words give you more energy to perform.

Motivation in stone age

But first we need to move, a way back in time. Actually to the first people on earth, what was their motivation?
To survive, they needed to get food to survive, if you did not find any food your own body/you self would suffered, in the next step the motivation came from helping your own family, and after that your “relatives/other family” and maybe “friends”. That was the basic, but when you have achieved that, you could get some extra attention by being the best hunter (your professional role), and you might got a better position in the “team” because of that.

That’s way back in time so what do I know? But it could have been that way.

Motivation in modern times

If we translate it to modern time, could it be that the same basics are still there? If your own body is threatened or you see an opportunity that will gain you, you will react, right? You will try to run away/fight or grab the opportunity, because it’s about you, you are the most important for you! Things that will affect you will always create energy and motivation.
Just think of the headings or the first pages of the newspapers, each heading is formulated so you would react and buy the newspaper. “Top 50 people earning most in your town”, “The new flue, read how you will be affected”, “Ketchup causes cancer, you might be affected” If you don’t buy the newspaper or visit the website the “heading” makers have failed…

Players on the transferlist

Players that are on the transfer list or affected about “changing team” rumors will in many cases perform outstanding, sometimes they will perform poorly because they are too affected by this and choose to escape/run away. Either way the situation has created energy, but as in the second case it was misdirected.

Floorball goal scoring and shooting practices

What we care about, will motivate us

The things that are closest to a person’s heart that will create energy/motivation to do something will differ between people, but below you find general things, that motivate people, things that make people react in some way. You need to figure out this picture for each and one of your players to be able to motivate them, by understanding their closest to “heart things”. The closer the things are you the more reaction it will create, the order can vary between persons and there are of course many other things to put in there.

  1. Your own body / You
  2. Family, relatives and friends (teammates, here or further away)
  3. Traits and talents
  4. Opinions and values
  5. Social position, professional role, performance, possessions, looks etc.
  6. Club, nation, culture etc.

This a general picture and as I wrote earlier, it can vary a lot between people or in this case team members.

Why do you do things, what are the motives?

What about the floorball practices, why are your players coming there? What are their motives or their “closest to heart subjects”? Some of the answers you have already read about, but you need to explore this more in your own team, to understand your participants.

See the first 15 seconds, to get the explanation, to why the Waterboy, chose that particular class.

What motivates a floorball coach?

What then motivates a floorball coach? What motivates José Mourinho? After winning the triple with Inter he declared immediately after, that his work was done, he had created history with the team and that he needed new challenges in a new team. (Real Madrid)

I think José Mourinho finds his motivation and energy in aiming for the big titles, creating history and building up underdog teams to champions (maybe it’s hard to call Real Madrid for underdogs, but for the moment, they are behind Barcelona).

– Porto was struggling, Mourinho made them winners of the Champions League
– Chelsea hadn’t won the Premier League for 50 years, before Mourinho arrived.
– Inter were struggling in the Champions League, last victory was from 1965. With Mourinhos lead they won the Serie A, Coppa Italia and Champions League.
– Real Madrid has won the UEFA Champions League 2002 and La Liga 2008, so it has been a while a go for a team of Real Madrid’s caliber, that’s why Mourinho is in Madrid, this is his challenge and motivation, to get the big titles back to Madrid.

So by explaining why and finding subjects that are important for each person you can motivate others. What you are then doing, is to make them to take a “step over the line” from passive to active team members. It’s when this is done, you can expect real results.

You can have expectations on results, but if the players have not taken the step over the line, you will not see any results, it will rather be explanations, excuses and external factors, to the missing results, and many times a sacked/fired coach after a while.

This could be shown, when you are introducing your game set up going from 1-2-2 to 2-2-1 or 1-3-1. If you don’t manage to explain why this is the best system for the team, you can have players not “stepping over the line” and therefore the results might not be there.

Floorball running with ball practices and drills

A practical example – Penalty Shot

Let’s have an example, a penalty shot. If you would not have pointed out a penalty shooter, what reactions would this situation create inside your players?

Most of them would see this as a threatening situation (they are personelly affected) and would make anything in their power to avoid the situation (excuses, tired, small injury, I usually miss the goal on practice, and moving the responsibility between the other team member, you can take it etc.)  Why would your players want to take the penalty shot (step over the line)?

1. Your own body / You
2. Family, relatives and friends (teammates, here or further away)
3. Traits and talents
4. Opinions and values
5. Social position, professional role, performance, possessions, looks etc.
6. Club, nation, culture etc.

Egoistic reasons, I want to be in focus (1.). I do it for the team and my team mates (2.). I get an opportunity to expand the professional role (I will get the opportunity next time as well) (5.).  I do it for my nation (6.)

The players that find these why reasons inside themselves, will probably be more successful than a player that’s forced to take the penalty shot, they might just ask themselves, why me?

The answer to why

Other areas to think about regarding the why explanation, is when you are choosing drills to your practice, why this drill? When you have the answer for yourself, you might need to explain it to your players as well, or?

If you manage explaining why and finding subjects that are important for each person you can motivate others, you will make them “step over the line”. This will be shown in:
– All team members are personally committed and interested in the success of the team
– All players understand why they are in the team (their role) and what affect they have on the whole team performance
– Leaders and coaches continuously communicate why, and try to connect it to each of the players “closest to heart things” (success of the team should be a common interest for each player)
…and therefore everybody realizes that their contribution will make difference for the team and themselves, from the top scorer to waterboy!

Floorball – The power of three letters – WHY

Think of a situation where you did not have the true energy or motivation to do something. Do you have the picture and the feeling?

I can use one of my examples, it’s of course from the sports. I played football and had my position to the right on the midfield. On some of the drills on our football practices I was supposed run up on the border and then make turn and run in towards the middle, and then the defenseman would pass the ball on the same side I was running from, to a forward that was meeting up the ball.

I found it totally unnecessary and useless doing that and therefore asked the coach, why I’m running the way I were, I just got the answer that I needed to do so, it was part of the drill… Do you find it exciting?

Ok I did not have José Mourinho as the head coach and I wasn’t David Beckham and as you see I didn’t have the opportunity either.

Floorball youth skills drills and practices

Explaining Why

What if the coach would have explained it this way? You need to run on the border and turn into the middle to get their left midfielder to follow you to the centre, by doing this you will create some space at the border, since their midfielder will follow you, and therefore we can pass the ball to our own forward in that space you have created through your run, and from there we can start our next move, so you are making an important run to create space for your teammate and for us to make the next move.

So what was the secret? WHY, you are doing something. Can you see the difference in the motivation and energy level of a young player?

Mourinho, do he need to explain why?

José Mourinho is of course not facing this simple problem, but he will still need to explain WHY, many, many times to his players. Sometimes it’s even harder to get your experienced players trying to do some new things, because some of them will be “yesbuts”, yes but, we are used to do it this way, and then you really need to explain WHY, they need to do things differently or your way.

“Yesbut we are different”
“Yesbut we have already tried it in the past”
“Yesbut our people don’t like it”
“Yesbut but my responsibility will change”
“Yesbut it will destroy our game”
“Yesbut it does not fit our structure”
“Yesbut our fans do not need it”
“Yesbut we are obliged to …”

God bless the whynotters!
They dare to dream…. and act, thereby achieving what others see as unachievable.

Why is also important in general terms, for why you are playing floorball, why are you here in this floorball team? You can also ask that question to yourself, why are you coaching, why are you a floorball coach?

Non-professional floorball players (main reasons)

Really young floorball player: Why are you playing?
–         I want to be a floorball pro
–         My parents want me to play
–         I have my best friend David here

Young floorball player: Why are you playing?
–         I want to be a floorball pro or at least try to earn some money on it
–         I have my friends here

Semi-professional Floorball player: Why are you playing?
–         I get some extra money
–         I like the chat in the locker room
–         I just like it, it’s part of me
–         It keeps me in shape
–         It’s nice to say you are a floorball player, to the girls in the bar
–         I like floorball

Professional floorball players (main reasons)
–         I earn my living
–         I want to win the league/big titles
–         I want to be a better football player
–         I like the chat in the locker room
–         I just like it, it’s part of me
–         I like floorball
–         I want to win (game, league, tournament)

“I told Adrian Mutu, you are already a rich boy, you won a lot of money, you are still in a big contract. So no problem with your future about money, no problem about prestige in your home country. When you go back to Romania you will be one of the kings. But five years after you leave football nobody remembers you. Only if you do big things. This is what makes history.”  /José Mourinho

Youth floorball practices and drills

When you are coaching floorball on “lower” levels you need to understand why your players are there, to be able to pull the right strings, your floorball players will have many reasons to why they want to play floorball, have you asked them?

Why are your Floorball players there?

What about if you are José Mourinho? Somehow there is no difference, you still need to know why, why are your players there, the main reason is not just that they have a contract with the team (in that case they probably already are sitting on the bench) or that they want to earn a lot of money, because they already are. So what is it then?

That’s a question I can not give you the right answer on, you need to know your players to understand, why they continue their career and what motivates them, and I mean each and one of them, because you will not get the same answer from each and one of the players!

Floorball Leadership eBook >>

Floorball performance, (Talent + ability) X motivation/attitude = Individual performance

Correct Attitude = Success

Motivation and attitude to a floorball practice or game is crucial for success. You can for instance rarely (if ever) change the external conditions before a game or training/practice, soft/hard floorball field, cold/hot weather, a long journey to away games, late/early start of the match (lunch or lasagna games in Italy), big or small floorball arenas, etc., but you can change/affect your mind and attitude of how you deal with these situations, you can learn to accept and deal with the situation and see it as a strength for yourself or for the whole team (assuming that the other teammates also are capable of dealing with the situation this way).

Floorball scoring and shooting practice drills

A model to show the importance of correct attitude in floorball

There is a model, for attitudes importance in sports/floorball/work etc. on a scale of 1 to 5, you value three areas, talent, ability (skills) and attitude. Based on a formula these three together create a theoretical performance result for the individual or group.

I will try to translate this into two examples, it could look like this. The first example is a floorball player with, a little more talent (4) than the average, he/she has also a bit more ability/skills to solve the task (4), but the attitude / motivation falters and is below average (2). In example two, we have an average good floorball player with the ability (3) and skill (3), but this player always perform well (good attitude and motivation), regardless of external conditions and can deal with these without affect on the motivation / attitude (5)
Floorball Player 1: (4 + 4) x 2 = 16
Floorball Player 2: (3 + 3) x 5 = 30

With these results it would be obvious who would win the game, but this is for indivual player motivation and performance, but connected to Steiner’s model you can work with it in a practical way. A good motivated team can beat an unmotivated skilled team on every level.

“When you play another team with the same qualities as you, normally the best one wins.”  /José Mourinho
…If it wasn’t for the attitude / motivation part.

“Talent is not enough”

You or your floorball players can have all the talent in the world, or the best plans and targets to reach them (direction), but if you don’t have the energy and engagegement (why should I do something, what’s in it for me, what are the opportunities or threats), nothing will be done or it will not be done in the best way.

José Mourinho has openly complained about Karim Benzema’s attitude. During Real Madrids pre-season camp in the U.S. the question came up and Mourinho said that the 22-year-old must improve.
“Benzema needs to understand that he is extremely talented, but it is not enough. I need Karim. For me, it is important that the players throw themselves out. We need a striker who is glowing, not one that is completely without energy” /José Mourinho

“Remember what I said, this is an individual sport. Each player must take care of their own tasks, if the team will be successful” /Swedish hockey coach

“You need to remember that a team consist of individuals, that are cooperating with each other. The team itself will only exist if the cooperation is working well between the individuals” /Swedish hockey coach

Floorball game running and focusing on defense

Give 100 % in floorball

What makes 100%? Here’s a little funny mathematical formula, that might help you answer these questions:
is represented as:
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26
8+1+18+4+23+15+18+11 = 98%
11+14+15+23+12+5+4+7+5 = 96%
1+20+20+9+20+21+4+5 = 100%