Floorball – Conflict handling – Relationship vs Performance / results

It’s easy to sacrifice relationships, when you are only hunting for results, the same goes for conflict handling.

Conflict handling, Avoid, Bulldozer, Concensus, Compromize, Sacrifice

On the Y-scale you have relationship and on the X-scale the performance. Depending on the size of the conflict or if you value relationship or performance higher there are some different ways to solve a conflict.

Avoidance – If there is a minor conflict, your players will forget it soon and it will not affect the performance nor the relationship.

Adjust/accept – You value the relationship higher than the performance and accept to adjust and give the other part right.

Compromise – Lose – Lose situation, none of the parts in the conflict will get their wanted solution and need to give up something. Example. A wants A as a solution B wants D as a solution, but you end up with C…

Bulldozer – You value the performance/results higher and are ready to sacrifice the relationship, you decide!

Consensus – Win-Win discussion, was it a misunderstanding from the beginning? Find a way to a win-win situation through guiding the dialogue.

Floorball – Conflict Handling

First things first, calm down. An old referee used to tell anyone who would listen to him this one thing, once a floorball coach begins to yell, the discussion is over. Take his advice, speak slowly and speak softly. When conflict occurs, your best bet is to remain calm, remain logical, and speak your piece. Listen to what the other party is saying and take it seriously, and most of all, understand that you will not win most of the time, and it should not be the main purpose.

Working together as a floorball team

So, conflict happens, so now what?  Well, smart floorball coaches understand that in conflict, there is opportunity. During a conflict, the way you act will determine the ground rules for the next dispute. For instance, if during a floorball practice the head coach yells back at a frustrated player, there is a good chance that this player will shut down and stop dealing with this coach. On the other hand, if the coach remains calm, speaks his mind, and deals honestly with the floorball player, the coach will open lines for future communication.

So remember to calm down, conflict isn’t necessarily a bad thing. In conflict, there is an opportunity to exchange points of view. Conflict can be viewed as a chance to learn another point of view.  And besides all that, no one wins them all.

Floorball – Dealing with conflicts

Floorball coaching by its nature can be very stressful. The floorball head coach has agreed to place himself in a situation where he will repeatedly face conflict. Over the course of a floorball season, the head coach will likely have disputes with opposing coaches and game officials, as well as from his or her own floorball players and their family members / parents. No matter what a floorball coach decides to do, it is highly likely that his decision will be questioned or even resisted by someone.

Waiting time at floorball practice before a drill

So what’s a coach to do about this? Well, the first thing that a new coach has to understand is that it WILL happen. It is unavoidable, conflict will continually pop up as long as you are coaching. Quite honestly, if you can’t accept this now… quit, save yourself the mental anguish. But if you decide to remain, then you are going to need some help in dealing with it. Some tools and other posts are found on this site, use the search function or keywords.